Survey Results – The Details

About this Survey

The WIA Reform Group decided to conduct a survey in April 2016 to better gauge the opinions of Australian amateurs.  The survey was open all amateurs, not just WIA members.  The WIA Reform Group has made observations about the results and recommendation where appropriate.

The WIA conducted its own survey in 2014: it appeared unclear to us what actions the Board had taken since, and what outcomes were being used by the Board to direct its decision and policy making.  There has been very little, if any, followup communication from the Board.  The only significant activity the Board has performed in the last two years has been the office restructure, and that has been of limited benefit to members.  The restructure has cost the Institute a considerable sum of money and there are genuine concerns over the manner in which the project was managed.

The WIA Reform Group is hopeful that the new Executive Administrator will settle into his new role and address many of the office issues.

The survey was divided into two sections.  The first section was designed to gauge feedback in relation to the membership services provided by the WIA.  This includes services like the QSL Bureau, Bookshop, Callsign services, and examination services, Amateur Radio Magazine, Awards and Contests.

The second section was designed to obtain an insight into the broader services provided by the WIA in the areas of government representation and overall management by the Board.

  • Appendix 1 provides a sample of respondent’s comments to questions asking them for their feedback about the Office and WIA as a whole.
  • Appendix 2 provides a summary of results from non-WIA members.
  • Appendix 3 describes the method used to conduct the survey.

The majority of respondents (67%) are WIA members, and it is promising that many non-members have contributed.  Only by listening to non-members can we gain a possible insight into why they do not join our national institute.

Unsurprisingly, 74% of respondents come from the three large eastern states.  It was noted that the 7% of results came from the smallest mainland call area; that being Northern Territory.

WIA Office & Member Services

Overall, 45% were either very or somewhat satisfied with membership services, as well as the National Office.  Just over 30% had a neutral view, indicating that many have had little or no contact with the office or using membership services.

Given about 33% of respondents were non-members this is probably not surprising.  About 23% were dissatisfied with services.  As with any service organisation it will be impossible to please all the people all the time, but a more detailed analysis of the possible sources of dissatisfaction is presented in later in this report.  Anecdotal evidence from comments and feedback support the above results.

SURVEY 2 SURVEY 1

Many respondents indicated they were very happy with the Examinations Officer and new Executive Administrator but that back-end processes meant considerable delays with some services.  About 80% of non-WIA members have used Licencing and Examination services.

It was also noted that a concerning number of respondents (15%) received no response to their requests when contacting the office.  It is noted the WIA does not have a management system for tracking and managing member and non-member enquiries, so whilst it is disappointing, it is not surprising that 15% of all enquiries appear to “drop into a black hole”.

The general results indicate that about half the respondents who contact the office are happy with the office staff, but back-end processes need to be addressed.

Refer to Appendix 1 for a sample of comments from Survey respondents.

The WIA Reform Group has a number of strategic recommendations that could improve the services delivered by the WIA National Office and benefit the WIA as a whole.

  • Implement a service request tool/ticketing system to ensure a proper management system is in place to handle queries. This would also provide the Board with key measurements by which to direct resources and manage workloads. No more lost enquiries in the black hole.  It would be very useful for the Board to properly understand just how many queries come to the office each year (estimate is 15,000 emails per year.  How many phone calls?).  The Office must be handling thousands of enquiries each year, but a lack of a useful management system leaves the management team with little or no idea of volumes, demand, and actual services requested and delivered.  This is not the first time this recommendation has been made.
  • Undertake a professional review of business processes to identify improvements and opportunities to move services on-line; this also has the opportunity to reduce staffing and administration costs.
  • Implement collaboration tools to enable greater efficiency for office staff, board members and committees/working groups

 

WIA Digital Services and Internet Presence

At present, the WIA only has an internet site (http://www.wia.org.au).

SURVEY 4 SURVEY 3

Given we are very much in the digital age, the WIA must improve its internet site and present itself as relevant to the future generation of amateurs.  Some amateurs avoid the newer technologies and that is their prerogative.  However, the WIA Board is resisting a move to be a more dynamic and relevant organisation.

If we want our WIA to appeal to a broader range of the population and be more efficient and effective in communicating to the membership and public at large, serious consideration must be given to a more robust and modern internet presence.  These observations are reflected with the internal management systems as well.  A starting point for improvements would include:

  • Using industry standard Content Management Systems (the system that is used to build and maintain the WIA’s internet site)
  • Making the website mobile and tablet friendly
  • More relevant and up-to-date content
  • Facebook and/or Twitter (both these can be implemented in a manner which reduces administration)
  • Introduction of collaboration tools across the Board, committees and office functions.

The WIA Reform Group recognises that all of this takes work and skill.  The Board must set a more dynamic policy and consider seeking volunteers with the skill and interest to help with these important tasks.  But attracting and retaining willing volunteers will require a change in mind-set by our Board.

We cannot leave this important service delivery and marketing channel to wallow due to an out-dated mindset.

Digital Amateur Radio magazine

The use of digital delivery of the Amateur Radio magazine remains a polarising topic.  60% of respondents were in favour of a reduced membership fee to forego the paper copy of the magazine.  It is noted that AR Magazine is delivered in PDF format.  The ideal outcome would be a truly digital magazine (like CQ) where hotlinks and multi-media content can be embedded.  This, of course, would require additional work by contributors and the editorial team.  The results from the survey did not swing strongly either way.  This is clearly an issue that requires further investigation.

The WIA Reform Group appreciates that moving to a “digital magazine only” membership class presents financial risks for the WIA.  A solid argument will need to be put to members if this option is to be considered.  Members may need to be prepared to make a concession in order for the WIA to free up money for promotion, education and representation for the long term security of our hobby.

 

WIA Representation and Management

An overall assessment of the results in this section of the survey clearly indicates the WIA Board is not meeting the expectations set by its own charter, nor are they engaging with the clubs or members as expected.  At the very least, communication and expectations are inadequate, with very little visible progress for most Australian amateurs. Overall, the WIA Board of management do not enjoy a positive reputation with the majority of respondents.

Overall satisfaction with the WIA

41% are somewhat or very dissatisfied and 27% being neutral.  Only 32% are very or somewhat satisfied.

SURVEY 6 SURVEY 5

 

Would you recommend WIA to a friend?

The Board should be very concerned with these results.  Only 43% would recommend membership to a fellow radio amateur.

How well is the Board working to visibly improve and protect Amateur Radio privileges with the government.

SURVEY 7

The Constitution states a key object of the WIA is “to protect and enhance the privileges of Radio Amateurs”

The Board is clearly failing with over half the respondents (55%) believe the board is not fulfilling this important charter.

The WIA Reform Group is finalising an analysis of the recent Submission to the ACMA by the WIA Board.  We will make this document available shortly.

How well does the WIA Board listen to the needs and concerns you have as an Australian radio amateur?

SURVEY 8

A clear majority (62%) believe the Board is doing an inadequate job in listening to Australian Radio Amateurs and WIA members. Only 21% believe this Board does somewhat well and a minority (16%) believe the Board is doing either somewhat or extremely well.  This result was echoed by individual respondent comments as well.  Refer Appendix 1 for a sample of comments.

How well has the WIA supported your local club and helped promote Amateur Radio in your local area?

SURVEY 9

Following on from the previous question, it’s clear this Board is not spending enough time talking to, or listening to members or clubs.  Almost 60% of respondents believe the WIA Board provides inadequate support to the clubs.  Anecdotal evidence suggests most amateurs would like to see more engagement from the Board at local club level.  Appendix 1 provides a sample of respondents’ comments that also indicate this is a problem.

How satisfied are you with the WIA’s approach to addressing interference from intruders and interference to our bands?

SURVEY 10

Some amateurs are unplugging their HF antennas, or at least are suffering from local noise created by non-compliant electronic devices.  Almost half the respondents (45%) have a negative view of the WIA’s approach to addressing interference. A further 40% were neutral on the subject, with only 15% having a positive opinion of the WIA’s effectiveness.

How satisfied are you with the communication and transparency of decisions made by the WIA Board?

SURVEY 11

In spite of recent changes by the Board, the majority (62%) of respondents are somewhat or very dissatisfied with communication and transparency of decision making. 23% are neutral and only 15% have a positive opinion.  This majority response indicates that there are opportunities for this Board to improve transparency and communication.

Are you concerned with the professional conduct and recent conflict of interest issues with some Board members?

SURVEY 12

82% of respondents are concerned about the conflicts of interest with certain Board members.  The Board has not addressed these concerns adequately and the professional judgement of certain board members must continue to be questioned.

 

 

Appendix 1 – Sample comments from respondents

Below is a representative sample of comments received for each of the following questions.

Please state at least one thing you believe the WIA Office does well

Petra is a very efficient worker.

Licensing and examination management

Fixing problems

Bookshop is good

New office manager seems to be get thing moving in the right direction

The WIA office is available during most business hours for enquiries.  The office manager was polite and knowledgeable, and got my enquiry completed in good time.

They do answer your questions quite good

Processes Examination Paperwork – no issues.

Please state at least one thing the office could do better

Could reply to emails in a more timely manner.

Communicate with it’s members, supply transparency as to members in regards to it’s day to day operations.

Better social media presence

Exams processing seems overly expensive compared with other countries.

No idea … what do I get for my money … not much value.

Oversight of license testing. Something is wrong.

Faster licence processing.

Respond to emails.

The entire exam service should be on line.  The whole process should happen on line from start to finish.

Please state at least one thing you would like to see the WIA do better.

 Get professional in the fulfilment of its role.

Listen to the members

Concentrate on listening to other board members concerns opinions objections and not to denigrate them

Not concerned as they have done the best they can as concerned club members.

Weekly updates on Facebook or email from the board and directors on thru area of governance

Advocate for additional bands and power increases to equal limits in other countries.  Cut costs of exam processing.

Be relevant to real amateur radio hams.

Seems disorganised and unco-ordinated

Act as one group with all board on the same page

Provide support for amateur radio education.  The current WIA education committee focuses on the examination process.

Promote education of Amateur Radio in schools. They are awash with money: spend it more on youth programs to introduce Amateur Radio.

Communication with Members Interacting with affiliated clubs

communication more open discussion in decision making process

Better action in getting stuff through the acma. I left the wia because i did not believe they did enough to get the 1KW license back on the table

 

Appendix 2 – Non-member Responses

Below is a summary of the results from non-WIA members.

How satisfied are you with the service used?

53% neutral

43% negative

4% positive

 

How would you rate the WIA web site

4% positive

51% neutral

37% negative

8% never visited

Given the first contact for many people with the WIA is for Foundation Licence enquiries, exam services and callsign administration, the WIA needs to make a better first impression.  The same goes with the web presence.  The first contact people have with any organisation has a major impact on purchasing decisions.

82% believe the WIA would benefit from an official social media presence.

78% would respond well to a “digital magazine only” membership

75% are unlikely to recommend WIA membership with 20% being neutral.

Not surprisingly, the overall sentiment from non-members was the WIA needs to improve its communications, decision making transparency and engagement with clubs.  It is a reasonable assumption that if the Board addressed these concerns we would have more members.

 

Appendix 3 – Survey Method

There may be some who wish to question the results of this survey.  Therefore, in the interests of transparency, we offer the following details regarding the survey method.  The WIA Reform Group used the Survey Monkey online survey tool.  The survey was made available online to all Australian amateurs with internet access.  We did not target specific interest groups.  Links to the survey were provided on our website, distributed to clubs and interested members via email and made available on various Facebook pages.  The only requirement was that respondents needed to have internet access.

Rather than focus on the best methods for conducting the survey, we utilised statistical theory and on-line calculators to determine our survey size.

SURVEY 13

http://help.surveymonkey.com/articles/en_US/kb/How-many-respondents-do-I-need

The above link should answer any questions you may have regarding the statistical outcome that resulted from this survey.  We used the following metrics.

Population size: 10,000  (probably too large given many amateurs are not active, and many don’t really care about the hobby enough to take an interest).

Margin of error: 6%

Confidence Level: 90%

Recommended sample size: 184 (actual number of respondents was 206)

The WIA Reform Group accepts that for a more critical application (e.g. Academic, commercial or scientific purposes), we would have sought the next significant sample size; probably about 350 responses.  This would have increased the confidence level to 95% and reduced the margin of error to 5%.

However, we believe that tightening the criteria would have made little material change to the overall results.  Given the serious concerns we have raised in recent months about the WIA, we were looking for overall trends and respondents “sense of quality”, hence our questions were not based on absolute numerical values. (eg. We did not ask “How long did you wait for a response when contacting the National Office?”)

The results presented in this paper reflect the opinions of the broad community within the specifications provided above.

Did you complete the survey?

29th April 2016. WIA Reform Group – News Letter Number 4

WIA Reform Group – http://www.wiarg.org

29th April 2016.  WIA Reform Group – News Letter Number 4

Good afternoon,

Since last week we’ve been busy analysing the results from our online survey.  We hope you took a few moments to complete the survey.  The results will be published on the web site in the next 24 hours.

We will send you the link when the results are up.

The WIA Board met on 19th April and we know they tabled and discussed our request for a Directors Register of Interest to be implemented.    Refer to:   http://wiarg.org/register-of-interests-for-wia-board-members

We felt this would be a positive step towards avoiding future conflicts of interest.  We have written to the President, Phil Wait asking for confirmation that the proposal was considered and implemented.  To date, we have not received a response.

We are also in the final stages of analysing the Board’s Submission to the ACMA, which was presented to the ACMA on 12th April 2016.  We are concerned with some of the content in the Submission, not the least being a lack of consultation with WIA Members, let alone the broader Australian amateur radio community.  Is this another example of a Board that does that not listen to, or consult with its own members?  Our analysis will be released in the coming week.

We hope to see the 2016 Annual Report and Financial Statements in the coming week, but President Phil Wait has indicated in the April edition of Amateur Radio magazine that the audit review is still underway.  We will be reviewing these documents closely and we encourage you to do the same.

We continue to campaign to make every Australian Radio Amateur aware of the issues and asking them to get involved.   As we have said, it’s a big job and not something the three of us can do alone.

Please spread the word.  Forward this email to your local club and friends.  Contact the National Office and Board Members calling for positive action.

Stay up-to-date with news and progress; – visit  www.wiarg.org .

And, please continue to email us with your feedback and ideas.

Until next week,

 

73

G.C. Dunstan VK4DU,   C. Chapman VK3QB,  R. Dollar VK8RD

PS. We don’t want to spam you.  Send us an email if you’d prefer we remove you from our mailing list.

Summary of survey results

About this Survey

The WIA Reform Group decided to conduct a survey in April 2016 to better gauge the opinions of Australian amateurs.  The survey was open all amateurs, not just WIA members.

As the WIA conducted its own survey in 2014 it appeared unclear to us what actions the WIA Board had taken since, and what outcomes were being used by the Board to direct decision and policy making.

The only significant activity the Board has performed in the last two years has been the office restructure, and that has been of limited benefit to members.  It has cost the Institute a considerable sum of money and there are concerns over the manner in which the project was managed.  The WIA Reform Group is hopeful that the new Executive Administrator will settle into his new role and address many of the office issues.

The survey was divided into two sections.  The first section was designed to gauge feedback in relation to the membership services provided by the WIA.  This includes services like the QSL Bureau, Bookshop, Callsign services, and examination services, Amateur Radio Magazine, Awards and Contests.

The second section was designed to obtain an insight into the broader services provided by the WIA in the areas of government representation and overall management by the Board.

 

WIA Office & Member Services

Overall, about half of respondents were satisfied with Office and Membership services.  Another 30% have had little or no dealings with the office, leaving about 20% who were dissatisfied with the Office.  Whilst there were no specific questions directed at office personnel, general comments indicate that most are either satisfied or very satisfied with the new Executive Administrator and Exams Officer.

There is adequate information to suggest that many respondents felt inefficient back-end processes and lack of automation in the office contributed to slow service in some instances (eg. callsigns, repeaters and exams).

A concerning percentage (15%) of respondents complained of receiving no response to queries lodged with the Office.  The bookshop was generally well rated.

The majority of respondents felt the WIA needed to do better with its web presence.  Only 23% felt the WIA web site was either of high or very high quality and 78% felt that the WIA and Australia Radio Amateurs would benefit from an official WIA social media presence.

The key message here is that the Board needs to rethink its internet and social media policy in order to be more relevant to the current and next generation of radio amateurs.  The WIA is simply regarded as irrelevant to many members of the broader community.

 

WIA Representation and Management

The resounding message is that our Board needs to do a better job.

Overall, 41% of all respondents are either somewhat or very dissatisfied, with a further 27% being neutral in their overall opinion of the WIA.   Only 43% of all respondents would recommend WIA membership to a fellow amateur.  Analysing WIA members only raised this figure to 62% with 21% being neutral.  This should be a major concern for the Board.   Surely nearly every member should be an advocate for our WIA?

The WIA Constitution states a key objective of the WIA is “to protect and enhance the privileges of Radio Amateurs”.  55% of all respondents do not believe that the Board is fulfilling this key objective. A further 21% believe the Board is only doing somewhat well.

A majority (62%) believe the Board is not doing a good job of listening to Australian radio amateurs with a further 21% believing it’s only doing somewhat well. This theme is further echoed with 59% reporting that the WIA is not doing well in supporting local clubs or promoting Amateur Radio in their local area.  Clearly, communication (full duplex, two-way) is an area this Board needs to address in far greater detail.

Transparency and good governance are supposed to be cornerstones of any well run club or corporation.  53% of WIA members surveyed were either somewhat or very dissatisfied with the Boards communication and transparency.  A further 27% were neutral.

On top of this, 82% of those surveyed were concerned about Board members having conflicts of interest.  This should sound an alarm to members that some members of the WIA Board are not operating in members best interests.

The above results clearly indicate that the reputation and brand value of the WIA requires some serious attention.  The Board needs to address some key cultural and service issues in order to be more inclusive and responsive to community and member expectations.

The full report will be released in the coming days.

The WIA Reform Group thanks all those who took the time to complete the survey.  A copy of the final report will be sent to the Board of the WIA.

22nd April 2016. WIA Reform Group – Newsletter Number 3

WIA Reform Group – http://www.wiarg.org

22nd April 2016.  WIA Reform Group – News Letter Number 3

Good morning,

Over the course of the last week we have been active on two fronts.

Firstly, we sent a letter to the board of the WIA asking them to introduce a Register of Interests for all board members.  We sincerely hope that the board will take our request seriously and implement this important process.  With what we saw in the second half of 2015, it’s clear that the elected members of this board need some process control and clear guidance when it comes to identifying and managing conflicts of interest.  There is more detail about this matter on our web site.

We have also placed a copy of the letter on the web site if you’d like to read it.  Just follow this link:

http://wiarg.org/register-of-interests-for-wia-board-members/

Secondly, we have launched a survey which has been designed to capture the views of all Australian Amateurs.  The survey focuses on two main areas of concern.

  1. The member services provided by the WIA and National Office
  2. Representation and Governance as provided by the board.

We respectfully ask all Amateurs to take some time to read the questions, answer the survey and consider the issues being raised.  If you are uncertain about any of the issues raised, please visit our website and read the information before you complete the survey.  You can complete the survey by following this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/wiarg

Please take a few minutes to complete the survey.  Make your voice heard!

We hope to see the 2016 Annual Report and Financial Statements in the coming week.   We will be reviewing these documents closely and we encourage you to do the same.

We continue to campaign to make every Australian Radio Amateur aware of the issues and asking them to get involved.   As we have said, it’s a big job and not something the three of us can do alone.  Please spread the word.  Forward this email to your local club and friends.  Contact the National Office and Board Members calling for positive action.

Stay up-to-date with news and progress; – visit  www.wiarg.org .

And, please continue to email us with your feedback and ideas.

Until next week,

 

73

G.C. Dunstan VK4DU,  C. Chapman VK3QB,  R. Dollar VK8RD

Ps. We don’t want to spam you.  Send us an email if you’d prefer we remove you from our mailing list.

Your WIA – have your say…

Are you happy with the WIA and the services it provides?

We have created an electronic survey using the popular Survey Monkey web portal.

The purpose of this survey is to obtain feedback from the Amateur Radio community as to the quality of member services offered by the WIA, as well as the governance and representation provided on behalf of all Australian Radio Amateurs by the Board of the WIA.

You do not need to be a member of the WIA to complete the survey.

Once the survey is complete we will consolidate and report the results.

Click here for the survey.

Have your say!

WIA RG

Feedback

We have received many emails of support over the past two weeks.  Here is a selection:

 

Guys,

Congratulations on the website and group you have formed. Finally I can see some factual instead of emotional commentary and something somewhat more professionally presented. A lot less “reading between the lines” to try and establish what is being criticised as well. I think more of this type of action and less of the anti social media innuendos will be respected by your peers, and harder for the current Board of malingerers and manipulators to sweep under the carpet as just social media whingers.

Well done.
Great Work.
Keep it going.

I so want an organisation that is out improve the hobby for all amateur radio enthusiasts. Remove the elitist mentality, respect that is many sub cultures of interest. Expand training and technical resources, and then send me a WIA membership form.

Well done. I have had misgivings about the management of the WIA for a while and am with you in your (our) quest for a more dynamic organisation. The web of “intrigue” must come to an end. I Say this with all due respect to Fred. ALL decisions must be transparent.

I agree that the WIA can and should be a tight ship, and one with a loud voice when it come to publicity and dealing with government etc. All the best in helping with reform / refinement.

 

Dear Sir,
I have just read the information on your site and I feel that there are some serious issues that must be addressed by the WIA, having been a past member (twice) over a 30+ year period I must admit I was less than satisfied with the service and backup I received from the WIA.

Over the years I have both heard and witnessed some very ordinary behaviour by those who pretend to support the hobby as office bearers, only to benefit themselves and their cronies, I will also state that there are many fine members and office bearers who work diligently and do have the hobby and the Institute at heart, however, it i these people that become the collateral damage when things turn bad.

The misuse and poor management of members fees and the day to to day operation only brings the organisation into disrepute and even at this time is reflected in the membership numbers when compared to the overall license holders in Australia, this in itself should give the board some indication of what the greater percentage of the fraternity thinks of the WIA.

I fully support your call for an overhaul of practices and a restructure of the WIA so that we as amateurs can have a lobby group that is strong, effective, progressive and represents a vast percentage of the licensees in Australia.

Sincerely & with my full support

 

As a member of the WIA since the 1970s and living in a regional area my day to day contact with the WIA has been extremely limited, often only my monthly copy of AR magazine.

It disturbs me when I begin to hear mention of mismanagement and other grumbles concerning the “Institute”. 

I applaud your group for standing up on behalf of members like me. Being remote from the main centers of action leaves one feeling a little impotent.

Thank you for your action and concern

 

Read both letters in AR and found it interesting that the connection between Fred Swainston and Silverdale Training & Development P/L who were commissioned to do the report into office operations was not mentioned 🙂

Talk about jobs for the boys and conflict of interest.

Good luck with your endeavours.

 

I wish you all the best with your endeavours. I am not a member of the WIA as I resigned many years ago due to infighting etc. However if you can sort things out I will be encouraged to rejoin.

Register of Interests for WIA Board members

The following letter was sent to the board on April 15, 2016.

 

The WIA Reform Group

www.wiarg.org

 

To:          WIA Directors

Cc:          David Williams – Secretary

 

15th April 2016

Gentlemen,

Given the recent issues associated with the conflicts of interest with board member Fred Swainston, the WIA Reform Group proposes that the Board immediately introduces a Register of Interests for all Board members.  It is now clear to many members that this director’s conflict of interest was not properly declared, documented or revealed to members (or compliant with Sect. 16.2 and 19 of the WIA Constitution).

It is generally very well accepted that many volunteers, amateurs and indeed, Board members have connections and business skills that can bring benefit to the WIA and its members.  There have been many examples over the years where members and volunteers have donated skills, time, equipment and resources to the betterment of the WIA and the hobby in general.  We are certain there are many others.  Where appropriate and in the best interest of the WIA, any such arrangements should be duly considered by the Board.

We propose that at the beginning of every Board meeting any potential conflicts of interest for Board Members (be they financial or of personal benefit) must be announced and registered.  These may include relationships with third party providers, family members, associations with companies etc.

The Board will then independently assess the declared interest (without the director present) to ensure that there is no conflict for the WIA or the director, and that the Board member’s own reputation is protected.

This process must also ensure the proposed arrangement provides the best value and outcome for the WIA and its members.

Where the Board determines that a business arrangement should proceed with a Board Member, a full disclosure must be placed into the Register of Interests, along with substantiating documentation to illustrate an impartial and independent assessment has been conducted by the Board.

Board meeting minutes will also need to be strengthened to include a full and complete detail of proceedings, as required by the Constitution (Sect. 16.2 & 19).

The Register is to be available to ordinary members on request.

Given this elected Board has continually failed the test of transparency and open communication and continues to tolerate mediocre conduct, putting such a process in place would go some way to rebuilding trust with members.

We look forward to a positive response in the near future.

Yours sincerely,

G.C. Dunstan VK4DU       C. Chapman VK3QB         R. Dollar VK8RD

WIA Members

 

15th April 2016. WIA Reform Group – Newsletter Number 2

Good morning,

We have been encouraged by the number of you who have contacted us sharing your concerns and supporting our efforts.

It’s been an important week with the elections results in.  Congratulation to Andrew Smith VK6AS, Paul Simmonds VK5PAS and Phil Wait VK2ASD.  At least we have some opportunity for positive influence with the new board.  But more work is required.

As advised last week, we have sent further letters to the editor of Amateur Radio magazine.  Unfortunately, the magazine editor decided not to publish our letters.  But you can read them on our website.

We won’t repeat the content here other than to say the Board’s responses to Chris Chapman’s letter in the April edition of Amateur Radio magazine were severely lacking.  Read the letters on our website and contact the office or the Board if you too want proper answers.

We hope that those of you who are members of affiliated clubs were not too inconvenienced by the appallingly inadequate manner in which the Public Liability Insurance renewals were handled.   We were able to get an alert notification and advice to the clubs on Monday.  Hopefully the issues have been resolved and the Board and National Office will not allow a repeat of this debacle next year.  Some very simple project planning and communication from the National Office would have gone a long way to averting the problem.

On a more positive note we’re also reviewing a number of opportunities to put proposals forward to improve our WIA.  Some of these proposals will address service related issues (like contacting the office and getting a response in a consistent manner) through to significant cost saving opportunities.

The next major milestone will be the release of the 2016 Annual Report and Financial Statements.  They need to be released to members within about two weeks.   We will be reviewing these documents closely and we encourage you to do the same.

We continue to campaign to make every Australian Radio Amateur aware of the issues and asking them to get involved.

As we said last week, it’s a big job and not something the three of us can do alone.  Please spread the word.  Forward this email to your local club and friends.  Contact the National Office and Board Members calling for positive action.

In closing, we would like to congratulate Ron, VK2DQ and the Radio Electronic School (http://www.res.net.au/) on their new Foundation Licence apps for Android and Apple mobile phones – more details at http://www.wia.org.au/licenses/foundation/mobileapp/index.php

Stay up-to-date with news and progress; – visit  www.wiarg.org .

And, please continue to email us with your feedback and ideas.

Until next week,

73

G.C. Dunstan VK4DU,  C. Chapman VK3QB,  R. Dollar VK8RD

We don’t want to spam you.  Send us an email if you’d prefer we remove you from our mailing list.